Photo courtesy of wwaytv3.com

by: Ben J. Carnevale, Contributing Writer

For those readers who reside in the path of Hurricane Sandy over the next few days, our staff offers a reminder of the many disaster preparedness mobile apps available from the American Red Cross.

The American Red Cross has worked hard in transforming itself for the future – and just a small part of that great effort includes this series of disaster related mobile device applications available to everyone.

Please check out the following disaster preparedness and disaster recovery mobile device applications:

  1. Hurricane App – this application monitors conditions in your area or throughout the storm track,  can help to find assistance and let others know you are safe even if the power is out – a must have for anyone who lives in an area where a hurricane may strike or has loved ones who do.
  2. First Aid App – This app: (1) features simple step-by-step instructions to help guide you through every day first aid scenarios, (2) is fully integrated with 911 so you can call EMS from the app at any time, (3) presents videos and animations to help make learning first aid fun and easy, (4) offers safety tips for everything, from severe winter weather to hurricanes, earthquakes and tornadoes help you prepare for emergencies, (5) includes preloaded content which offers you instant access to all safety information at any time, even without reception or an Internet connection, and (6) tests your learning with interactive quizzes.
  3. Wildfire App – presents step-by-step instructions which let you know what to do before/during/after a wildfire, even without data connectivity, (2) presents notifications about current wildfires or wildfire-conducive weather, (3) is able to let your family and friends know you are okay with the customizable “I’m Safe” alert for Facebook, Twitter, email and text, (4) helps you find open Red Cross shelters in your area when you need help, (5) includes a strobe light, flashlight and audible alert functions, (5) teaches you to prepare for the worst by learning how to assemble an emergency kit for your family in the event of power outage or evacuation, (6) empowers your family to stay safe and remain calm in an emergency by learning how to make and practice an emergency plan.
  4. Shelter Finder App – this application: (1) maps locations and shelter details across the United States –giving you shelter details such as the agency managing the shelter, capacity of the shelter and current population, the associated disaster event and the specific shelter address and location, (2) offers view of each open shelters by state, (3) uses data about open shelters from the American Red Cross National Shelter System (NSS), (4) maintains updated information from the NSS every 30 minutes.
  5. Earthquake App – this application: offers step-by-step instructions let you know what to do even before/during/after an earthquake, even if no data connectivity, (2) allow you to be notified when an earthquake occurs with notifications generated by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), (3) lets you see graphically the perceived shaking impact to your area or those of loved-ones, (4) lets family and friends know you are okay with the customizable “I’m Safe” alert for Facebook, Twitter, email and text, (5) finds open Red Cross shelters in your area when you need help (5) includes a strobe light, flashlight and audible alert functions, (6) teaches you how to prepare for the worst by learning how to assemble an emergency kit for your family in the event of power outage or evacuation, (6) empowers your family to stay safe and remain calm in an emergency by learning how to make and practice an emergency plan, (7) allows you to see an illustrated history of earthquakes in your area, and more.

TO GET ANY OF THESE APPS FOR YOUR MOBILE DEVICE:

From your mobile phone, call **REDCROSS ** (73327677) and the American Red Cross will send you a link to download the app or visit iTunes or Google Play app stores.

Please pass this information along to your family members and to those first responder disaster recovery team members in your community and where you work.

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